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The Reception of American Cinema in Japan  

Hiroshi Kitamura and Keiko Sasagawa

Online publication date:
Oct 2017
Since the 1890s, Japanese movie-goers have engaged American cinema in a wide consumer marketplace shaped by intense media competition. Early fandom grew around educated urban audiences, ... More

American Nuclear Literature on Hiroshima and Nagasaki  

Shoko Itoh

Literature on Hiroshima and Nagasaki cannot be limited to works on the atomic bomb or fiction referring specifically to these locations. Rather, in the nuclear age, it must include a ... More

American and Japanese Self-Help Literature  

Shunsuke Ozaki

“Self-help literature” was created in America, and its origin can be traced back to Benjamin Franklin. In 18th-century American society, where Puritan ethics held sway, Franklin was a rare ... More

The Reception of American Literature in Japan during the Occupation  

Hiromi Ochi

The reception of American literature in Japan was radically altered after the Second World War. Before the war, only a handful of works on American literature were published, and the ... More

Reading Culture in Japan  

Andrew T. Kamei-Dyche

Reading in Japan has a rich history replete with transformative moments. The arrival of Chinese logographs by the 5th century necessitated the development of reading mechanisms adapting ... More

The Reception of Beat Writers in Japan  

Hidetoshi Tomiyama

The Beat writers, especially Jack Kerouac (1922–1969), William Burroughs (1914–1997), Allen Ginsberg (1926–1997), and Gary Snyder (1930–), have been well known in Japan. Though Snyder’s ... More

The Reception of African American Literature in Prewar and Postwar Japan  

Keiko Nitta

Online publication date:
Jun 2017
Commodore Matthew C. Perry’s gunboat diplomacy provided the Japanese with the first known opportunity to observe a major American performing art inspired by black culture: the minstrel ... More

Japanese Proletarian Literature during the Red Decade, 1925–1935  

Heather Bowen-Struyk

Modern Japanese literature emerged as Japan asserted itself as a military-industrial power from the end of the 19th through the early 20th centuries. The subject of modern literature was ... More

U.S.-Japan Literary Interactions in the Transpacific Cultural History  

Takayuki Tatsumi

Online publication date:
May 2017
In 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry opened not only the doors of a “double-bolted land” as Herman Melville called Japan in Moby-Dick (1851) but also the possibilities of modern literature. ... More

Postwar Japanese Novelists and American Literature  

Kazuhiko Goto

Since the country’s decisive defeat through the acceptance of the unconditional surrender in 1945, Japanese novelists have been working in the shadow of America. The American Occupation ... More

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