You are looking at  1-10 of 26 articles  for:

  • American Literature x
Clear All

View:

U.S.-Japan Literary Interactions in the Transpacific Cultural History  

Takayuki Tatsumi

Online publication date:
May 2017
In 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry opened not only the doors of a “double-bolted land” as Herman Melville called Japan in Moby-Dick (1851) but also the possibilities of modern literature. ... More

19th-Century Southern Literature  

Lisa Hinrichsen and Michael Pitts

Online publication date:
May 2017
Defined by both cultural vibrancy and widespread poverty, and marked by a long and complex history of trade, migration, cultural exchange, and slavery, the literature of the U.S. South is ... More

Postwar Japanese Novelists and American Literature  

Kazuhiko Goto

Since the country’s decisive defeat through the acceptance of the unconditional surrender in 1945, Japanese novelists have been working in the shadow of America. The American Occupation ... More

Okinawa in American Literature  

Steve Rabson

The several works of American literature set in Okinawa or about Okinawans include travel narratives, war diaries, memoirs, biography, fiction, and drama. Perhaps the earliest, Francis L. ... More

Australian-American Literary Connections  

Paul Giles

Within the literary connections between Australia and the United States, the more traditional notion of “influence” gained a different kind of intellectual traction after the ... More

The Influence of American Literature in Taishō and Pre-War Shōwa Japan  

Ken Inoue

In the history of modern Japanese literature, the Taishō era (1912–1926) is retrospectively identified as a period characterized by a liberal arts ideology, individualism, a democratic ... More

American Nature Writing and Japan  

Masami Yuki

Although largely disregarded since the humanistic turn of ecocriticism at the beginning of the 21st century, nature writing has continued to play an important role in nurturing ... More

Science Fiction  

Gerry Canavan

Science fiction (SF) emerges as a distinct literary and cultural genre out of a familiar set of world-famous texts ranging from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) to Gene Roddenberry’s ... More

The Reception of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau in Meiji to Taishō Japan  

Yoshio Takanashi

Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau were fascinated by Asian philosophies and religions. The two American philosophers discovered “Asia” in their own Transcendentalist views of ... More

Jack Kerouac and Translingual Literature  

Hassan Melehy

Known primarily as the author of On the Road (1957), the novel most closely associated with the Beat Generation, Jack Kerouac (1922–1969) also wrote extensively about his French-Canadian ... More

View: