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The Reception of American Science Fiction in Japan  

Tadashi Nagasawa

American science fiction has been a significant source of ideas and imagination for Japanese creators: they have been producing extensive works of not only written texts but also numerous ... More

The Reception of Beat Writers in Japan  

Hidetoshi Tomiyama

The Beat writers, especially Jack Kerouac (1922–1969), William Burroughs (1914–1997), Allen Ginsberg (1926–1997), and Gary Snyder (1930–), have been well known in Japan. Though Snyder’s ... More

The Reception of Mark Twain in Japan from the Meiji Period to the Heisei Period (1860s–2000s)  

Tsuyoshi Ishihara

Why have so many Japanese people been fascinated with one of the most distinctively “American” writers, Mark Twain? Over the past hundred years, Mark Twain has influenced Japanese culture ... More

The Reception of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau in Meiji to Taishō Japan  

Yoshio Takanashi

Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau were fascinated by Asian philosophies and religions. The two American philosophers discovered “Asia” in their own Transcendentalist views of ... More

U.S.-Japan Literary Interactions in the Transpacific Cultural History  

Takayuki Tatsumi

Online publication date:
May 2017
In 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry opened not only the doors of a “double-bolted land” as Herman Melville called Japan in Moby-Dick (1851) but also the possibilities of modern literature. ... More

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