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Folklore in the United States  

Simon J. Bronner

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
Folklore in the United States, also known as “American folklore,” consists of traditional knowledge and cultural practices engaged by inhabitants of North America below Canada and above ... More

Indigeneity and Early American Literature  

Andrew Newman

Online publication date:
Feb 2017
Indigeneity is the abstract noun form of “indigenous,” defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as “Born or produced naturally in a land or region”; in conventional usage, it ... More

The Influence of American Literature in Taishō and Prewar Shōwa Japan  

Ken Inoue

In the history of modern Japanese literature, the Taishō era (1912–1926) is retrospectively identified as a period characterized by a liberal arts ideology, individualism, a democratic ... More

The Influence of Arthur Miller on American Theater and Culture and the Global Implications of His Plays  

Susan C.W. Abbotson

Arthur Miller (1915–2005) was the author of essays, journals, short stories, a novel, and a children’s book, but is best known for his more than two dozen plays, which include the seminal ... More

Jack Kerouac and Translingual Literature  

Hassan Melehy

Known primarily as the author of On the Road (1957), the novel most closely associated with the Beat Generation, Jack Kerouac (1922–1969) also wrote extensively about his French-Canadian ... More

Nineteenth-Century Southern Literature  

Lisa Hinrichsen and Michael Pitts

Online publication date:
May 2017
Defined by both cultural vibrancy and widespread poverty, and marked by a long and complex history of trade, migration, cultural exchange, and slavery, the literature of the U.S. South is ... More

Okinawa in American Literature  

Steve Rabson

The several works of American literature set in Okinawa or about Okinawans include travel narratives, war diaries, memoirs, biography, fiction, and drama. Perhaps the earliest, Francis L. ... More

Policing and Publishing in Modernist 20th-Century America  

Claire A. Culleton

Online publication date:
Nov 2016
For almost four decades, from 1936 to 1972, the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, J. Edgar Hoover, fueled by intense paranoia and fear, hounded and relentlessly pursued a ... More

Postwar Japanese Novelists and American Literature  

Kazuhiko Goto

Since the country’s decisive defeat through the acceptance of the unconditional surrender in 1945, Japanese novelists have been working in the shadow of America. The American Occupation ... More

Proletarian Literature Reconsidered  

Bill V. Mullen

Online publication date:
Jun 2017
Proletarian literature is best understood as strongly anticapitalist literature by or about working-class people. As a cultural form, proletarian literature is an expression of the ... More

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